Pepperl+Fuchs Photoelectric Sensors

Our broad range of photoelectric sensors is aimed at all automation solutions where noncontact object detection can be utilized. The wide variety of different operating principles, models, sizes and specifications means that the best possible sensor can always be found for the relevant application and all conditions that occur in practice can be met. In automation, photoelectric sensors in general provide all the benefits of fast and noncontact detection. They essentially consist of an emitter and a receiver unit. If an object moves into the beam path, for example, the receiver responds to changes in the amount of light received within milliseconds and converts the optical signal emitted by the emitter into an electrical switching signal. The photoelectric sensors operate with visible red light, invisible infrared light or powerful laser light as required.

The color and material of the detected objects do not generally play a significant role and even objects with transparent or reflective surfaces can be detected reliably. Among standard sensors, a distinction is made between the three functional principles of thru-beam sensors, retroreflective sensors and diffuse mode sensors, depending on the function and the relative position.

 

 

Photoelectric Sensors: 5 Things You Need to Know

Photoelectric sensors are a great choice for packaging, material handling, automotive, and many other applications. They use a light emitter, a light receiver, and a lens for detection. Photoelectric sensors are often the go-to sensor, when an inductive sensor does not fit the application. They are incredibly useful for detecting a variety of objects, but it is important to be aware of their limitations.

Read more about the five things you need to know about photoelectric sensors, here.

 

4 Lesser-Known Features of IO-Link Photoelectric Sensors

Pepperl+Fuchs IO-Link photoelectric sensors have many lesser-known features. In addition to operational parameters, sensor information, and other commonly used and viewed items, many of our IO-Link photoelectric sensors include features that are helpful in multiple applications. These features include locator indication, device control, trend charts, and data collection interval.

 

Learn more about the four lesser-known features of our IO-Link enabled photoelectric sensors, here.

 

5 Applications for Photoelectric Sensors

Photoelectric sensors use visible red light or infrared light detected by a receiver to determine the distance away an object is and the interruption in light emitted. Excellent for use in automation, photoelectric sensors provide fast, non-contact detection for multiple applications.

Photoelectric sensors come in different housing styles, types, and sizes and can be adapted to industry needs for any application. This new technology can be used in many applications in industry and automation and has the speed, accuracy, and reliability we expect from each sensor we provide.

R201 photoelectric sensor

Learn about 5 applications for photoelectric sensors, here.

 

What's the Difference Between Light ON and Dark ON Modes for Photoelectric Sensors?

Photoelectric sensors are available in such a wide variety of sensing modes (thru-beam, diffuse, retroreflective, etc.), the terms light ON and dark ON were introduced to better define what the sensor’s output is doing in the absence or presence of light. These terms apply only to photoelectric sensors. Because photoelectric sensors are available in such a wide variety of sensing modes (thru-beam, diffuse, retroreflective, etc.), the terms light ON and dark ON were introduced to better define what the sensor’s output is doing in the absence or presence of light. These terms apply only to photoelectric sensors.

Light ON (LO) means that the sensor’s output is only enabled or ON when it receives light. Otherwise, the output remains OFF. Dark ON (DO) means the opposite; when light is received, the output is OFF. The sensor’s output is only enabled or ON when it is dark or when it receives no light. See the figure below for further explanation.

Photoelectric sensing modes

Learn more about Light ON and Dark ON modes for photoelectric sensors, here.

 

What is a Multi-Ray Photoelectric Sensor?

Multi-ray photoelectric sensors are similar to a basic photoelectric sensor, but with the addition of more light sources or light beams. Multi-ray simply means more than one light beam.

multi-beam photoelectric sensing

Is there a specific type or style of multi-ray photoelectric sensors? Just like the basic, single beam photoelectric sensor, multi-ray photoelectric sensors can come in a large variety of sensing modes and housing styles.

Learn more about multi-ray technology, here.

 

5 Reasons Why Thru-Beam Photoelectric Sensors Are Great

Photoelectric sensors are available in a variety of housing styles and operating modes. Background suppression, diffuse, retroreflective, and thru-beam are some of the most common modes. Each mode has unique benefits. This blog discusses the benefits of using thru-beam mode photoelectric sensors.

Read more about the 5 reasons why thru-beam photoelectric sensors are great, here.