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Pepperl+Fuchs Blog

Does My Application Require a NAMUR Output Sensor?

Posted by Andrew Hund on Fri, Aug 25, 2017

NAMUR sensors solve the same applications that standard inductive and capacitive sensors or rotary encoders would—but they are safe to use in hazardous areas. NAMUR output sensors are ideal for applications where the presence of a volatile gas, vapor, dust, or fiber creates a possible hazard.


To prevent an explosion in hazardous areas, these sensors protect the circuit by operating at 8.2 V and less than 5 mA. These levels prevent the device from storing sufficient energy to initiate an explosion. NAMUR sensors are connected to an isolating amplifier, which limits the current and voltage to the sensor and amplifies the signal upon return.

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Topics: Rotary Encoders, Inductive Sensors, Capacitive Sensors, Applications

Cable Pulls-7 Ways They Pull Their Weight for Rotary Encoders

Posted by Patricia Stafford on Fri, Aug 05, 2016

While many applications use rotary encoders with shafts to monitor rotational speed, some situations call for a different solution—the use of a cable pull.

What all cable pulls have in common is that they are devices that, when used together with rotary encoders, provide precise linear measurements. They are ideal tools for applications where you need information on linear displacement feedback. Cable pulls have a lot to offer when it comes to mobile equipment (including cranes and forklifts), conveyor systems in material handling, safety switches, wind turbines, elevators, and more. 

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

Ask an Expert Industrial Sensors - Episode 18

Posted by John Appleson on Fri, Jun 10, 2016

This episode of Ask an Expert for industrial sensors examines and provides answers to interesting sensing questions we've received from customers just like you. We explore and answer these questions:

1. Can NJ40+U4+W inductive proximity switches be run in series?
2. Does the NBB4-F1-E0 inductive sensor come in a different Hz to eliminate mutual interference?
3. Do you have beam benders for photoelectric sensors?
4. Looking for a Class I, Div.1 inductive sensor that does not need an IS barrier...
5. Do you have a wire-draw displacement sensor?

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Topics: Rotary Encoders, Inductive Sensors, Photoelectric Sensors, Ask an Expert

Ask an Expert Industrial Sensors - Episode 17

Posted by John Appleson on Fri, May 06, 2016

This episode of Ask an Expert for industrial sensors examines and provides answers to interesting sensing questions we've received from customers just like you. We explore and answer these questions:

1. Motion detection sensor RMS-M-NA. Could this sensor be used to detect people in an area of a museum?
2. Can the capacitive sensor CJ40-FP-A2-P1 survive in a vacuumized vessel?
3. What is the Teach-in cable for the ultrasonic sensor UB100-F77-E2-V31, and how is it used?
4. Can you use an incremental rotary encoder with a higher PPR to replace one with a lower PPR?
5. What is the life expectancy of an inductive sensor in an outdoor, humid environment?

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Topics: Rotary Encoders, Inductive Sensors, Capacitive Sensors, Ultrasonic Sensors, Photoelectric Sensors, Ask an Expert

Webinar on Rotary Encoders: Meeting Today’s Needs with Precise Position and Motion Data

Posted by Patricia Stafford on Thu, Apr 21, 2016

Are you interested in seeing what’s new and exciting in the world of rotary encoders?

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

Not Sure Which Rotary Encoder to Use?

Posted by Valeria Morales on Fri, Oct 09, 2015

Magnetic encoders vs. optical encoders

What kind of technology does a rotary encoder use?  Your options include magnetoresistance, Hall-effect, Nonius, inductive, or optical for single-turn technology.

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

The Differences Between Absolute and Incremental Rotary Encoders

Posted by Patricia Stafford on Thu, Jul 30, 2015

What are the differences between absolute and incremental rotary encoders? Which one do I use when? These questions come up all the time. Our customers want to know.

Rotary encoders in general connect to a shaft and output pulses as the shaft rotates. You can determine the speed of an object based on how many pulses there are per revolution. The number of pulses that make up one full turn of the shaft determines the resolution. Incremental encoders have a resolution of up to 50,000 pulses per revolution (ppr) while absolute encoders have a resolution of up to 16 bits or 65,536 ppr.

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

3 Myths About Industrial Sensors

Posted by Amanda Blakeman on Wed, Oct 15, 2014

Everyone has their own idea of what an industrial sensor is and what it does.  But you might be surprised at how many of these ideas are inaccurate.  Here are several misconceptions about industrial sensors:

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Topics: Rotary Encoders, Inductive Sensors, Applications, Ultrasonic Sensors, Photoelectric Sensors, Inclination Sensors

Rotary Encoders are Everywhere!

Posted by Nick Ferguson on Wed, Oct 01, 2014

Have you ever entered an elevator and realized that the elevator cart was not level with the floor? Have you ever seen a conveyor system at the airport? What about measuring revolutions per minute or the actual CNC or robot position? What do all of these have in common? Rotary encoders!

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

What Are Rotary Encoders?

Posted by David Collica on Wed, Jun 04, 2014

I’ve never been in contact with one before!

Have you ever come across a rotary encoder? Do you know what it does? Rotary encoders are used in everyday machinery. The word rotary means rotational motion. This device operates by detecting the rotation of a disk turning around an axis. Here is some information I found that helped me gain knowledge that will also help you understand.

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Topics: Rotary Encoders

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