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Pepperl+Fuchs Blog

5 Ultrasonic Sensing Types that Raise the Bar in Difficult Applications

Posted by Zach Steck on Thu, Dec 11, 2014

Sometimes in life, you just can’t go with the crowd. You need to adapt to new realities, stand out, and become an expert at meeting the unique conditions that you’re facing. When there’s a particular problem to solve, you’re ‘the specialist’ who gets it done right!

If you need an ultrasonic sensor for a particular application, I’d like to introduce you to five sensing types in our ultrasonic sensor family. These problem-solving sensors are designed for specific conditions where an ordinary ultrasonic sensor just won’t do!

Ultrasonic sensors for hazardous locations

In order to be installed in hazardous areas, ultrasonic sensors have to meet specific safety requirements. They must be designed with hazardous locations in mind.

Our HazLoc ultrasonic sensors are UL and CSA certified for use in environments up to Class I, Div. 2.  The Class I, Div. 2 approved models are represented by –HA in the model number.  UC500-30GM-IU-V1-HA is an example.  There is also an –HB model that is usable in all Division 2 areas as well as Class II, Div. 1 and Class III, Div. 1 environments.  The example model number for this type is UC2000-30GM-IU-V1-HB.  All of the hazardous location ultrasonic sensors only have an analog output.  This is selectable for current (4 mA … 20 mA) or voltage (0 V … 10 V).  These sensors also include an M30 to 1/2” NPT adapter for connection through conduit.

Ultrasonic sensors for hazardous areasPTFE-coated transducer

If you are installing an ultrasonic sensor in an application where it may be exposed to abrasive chemicals, we recommend a PTFE-coated transducer.  These sensors provide maximum chemical resistance featuring a 316L stainless steel barrel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film placed over the transducer.  They are available in both switch point and analog output models.  We also offer them with a thru-beam or direct detection operating function.  You can identify PTFE-coated transducer sensors with the following model prefixes:

  • UBC...
  • UCC...
  • UBEC… (thru-beam)

PTFE-coated transducerFood and beverage ultrasonic

The UMC3000 series ultrasonic sensors are designed specifically for use in the food and beverage industry.  They feature a seamless stainless steel housing and transducer suitable for high-pressure, high-temperature washdowns (IP69K).  These are also ECOLAB approved, which ensures resistance to harsh cleaning agents common to these applications.  We offer these in either switch point or analog current outputs, and the mounting collar is included.

Ultrasonic sensors for food and beverageMiniature ultrasonic sensor

The F77 series was designed for very tight mounting spaces.  Its miniature housing and very short blind zone make it the perfect choice for space-restrictive areas. This sensor is available in three versions:

  • Direct detection (BGS)
  • Retroreflective
  • Thru-beam

Due to the wide sensing field, it reliably detects objects with holes or ridges as well as transparent or shiny objects.  The F77 also features high interference resistance against compressed air or machine noise, allowing it to be mounted in tough conditions.

Miniature ultrasonic sensorsSmall object thickness

A unique sensor model, UBH60/30-12GM-U-V1 can measure the thickness of an object between 0 mm … 30 mm.  It functions as a retroreflective sensor with a taught-in reference distance and provides 0 V… 10 V analog output based on the object thickness.  This sensor has a very fast response time and narrow projection cone, leading to quick and accurate measurements.  To ensure accuracy, this sensor tracks the reference distance to compensate for external influences such as temperature change.

Ultrasonic sensors for thickness measurement

If you have an application challenge, we'd love to help out. While we've discussed five possible problem solvers in this post, more are definitely available!

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Topics: Ultrasonic Sensors

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